9 Comments

  1. OrganicalBotanicals
    03/02/2016 @ 2:09 pm

    Toward Maturity, don’t panic if the Lower most leaves begin to turn brown. You can Prune some that u think may be trapping too much moisture in (u wanna keep the base where the Stem meet the soil clear of EVERYTHING),
    But don’t pull too many because they also act as a natural Weed block.
    It’s a Poppy’s way of Hogging Nutrients.
    Let them be Hogs and your stems will be Logs.
    Give a Poppy Room, and it will surprise you more blooms (as long as it gets enough direct sunlight).
    Also, another thing u may notice are “DRUG BUGS” on the bottom side of some of the lower leaves.
    Little black bugs – Don’t know their name, but let them be. They have a drug problem so don’t try to fight that battle. You’ll never win.
    PHOTO OF “DRUG BUGS”

    Poppies suck up a LOT of Nutrients from the Soil – so if you’re planting in the same place 2 years in a row, be sure to replenish the Soil’s Nutrients.
    Poppies use more Nitrogen than ANY other Nutrient during ALL Phases of Growth. So a Nitrogen Rich Organic Fertilizer will work.
    In my garden, nothing goes to waste. I’ve found that stripping the dried up leaves from from the end of your Current Season’s Poppies, and crumble them up into your Soil mix works great. There’s no better nutrient for a plant, then another decomposing Plant of it’s kind (we’re just not used to doing that in the Human world).
    Or, if you plant to Over-Winter, use a layer of your Crushed Leaf Powder to sprinkle on top of your new seeds.
    This will function in a multitude of ways.
    It will protect your seeds from birds, Frost, etc. While at the same time, holding in heat & moisture just enough to encourage a higher rate of growth.
    Lastly, by the time next Spring rolls around, they will begin to give back all that Vital Nitrogen.
    You can even use the stems if you can chop them up fine enough.

    Photos Of the BROWNING LEAVES

    Reply

  2. poppy615
    05/02/2016 @ 9:04 pm

    Hello, I have ventured into my first time growing these beautiful flowers.
    I am absolutely grateful for such a well put together tutorial.

    I live in TN area, and had some general questions about my set up.

    Firstly I started off my seeds in Peat pots in the fridge. I left them in the dirt in the fridge lightly watered for 24 hrs. I then took them out to sit on the window. Within 48 hrs after sowing the seeds I am already seeing them sprout(germinate with white tails)! I couldn’t believe it!

    So my questions are:
    1: have you ever seen this happen before? I am growing Hungarian blues.

    Next question:
    I am starting them off inside because I was afraid they wouldn’t sprout because it’s already getting up to 80 F.
    So if I start them inside and then transplant them to pots outside after they have sprouted,
    2:how long do I need to wait? Like how many weeks after germinating?

    I don’t wanna keep them inside but I don’t wanna move them outside if they will absolutey stunt. I geuss my question is,

    3:if I started them inside, is there a point when they are still young I can move em outside and they won’t stunt?

    They will be in pots whether outside or inside.

    I’m going to use your drainage system for my pots, and am thinking about using ceramic instead of plastic.

    4:How long should I leave the netting over it? Should I use copper tape or sluggo?

    5:How will they do in 80-90 F when adults?

    I was afraid I started them too late, so that’s why I’m starting them inside where I can control the temps for sprouting and immature plants. It seems the fridge really helped with germination. I was extremely pleased.

    I numbered my questions 1-5 to break it down so you know what to answer. I would love to get your opinions as an experienced grower.
    If my question set up is too confusing, let me know and I’ll fix it up.
    Thank you so much! I look forward to corresponding with you.

    Reply

    • OrganicalBotanicals
      05/06/2016 @ 2:10 pm

      1); Yes, I have seen this. This is normal. Those white strands are like little fingers reaching out to grab a hold of their foundation.

      2); This is a really long thing to explain. They won’t stunt if your temps are high already. The above tutorial was made back when we had regular temps in Spring. Please refer to our New Blog Post: PLANTING PAPAVER SOMNIFERUM POPPIES IN LATE SEASON OR IN HOT WEATHER

      3): Just keep them outside using the methods explained in the Pics above, as well as in other Comments I’ve answered below regarding crushed ice. No more inside.

      4); The netting is just for birds, but the net needs to be at least 4″ to 5″ above. Birds have special abilities- AND beaks! I wouldn’t worry about slugs when temps are 80+ (f).

      5): They can withstand 90(f) MAX when adults. 95 and they flop over and die. Try to place them somewhere that provides shade during peak Sunlight hours. They don’t need to be in the sun ALL DAY. They can do just fine with even a half day’s sun,as long as it’s consistent (for example, my neighbor has poppies growing on the side of her house, and they only receive morning sun. They’re doing fine. Since you are using Pots, you can move them, but don’t confuse them. Find a place and leave them (only move them if a really hot day comes along. Move them inside if you want – they won’t die without sunlight, if it’s just for one day)

      Hope this helps,
      -Orgbot

      Reply

  3. Kathleen
    05/02/2016 @ 11:53 pm

    I apologize in advance for the length of this commentary, I really need your advice. I have watched your tutorial over and over again, trying to get it right because I think I mentioned to you on Facebook that this is my third year trying to grow this plant and up until now I have not been successful. The Oriental variety seems to be a lot easier to grow for some reason. I dug them all up even though they are perennials because I did not want anything to compete with my somniferums.

    Are all somniferums annuals? Or is there a perennial variety? This would be great if you got a plant going and didn’t have to go through this process every year. I hate to complain, but it seems like this is a finnicky variety, though they are beautiful and useful. I admire plants that are both beautiful and useful because I live in an area that is full of gorgeous indigenous plants that need to be pulled up and destroyed to make way for ornamental plants at the cost of wildlife habitat.

    I was upset and frustrated today because I used plastic cups to create mini greenhouses for my tiny seedlings that were the only ones in my greenhouse that had sprouted. I planted them in a compost and potting soil mix in toilet paper rolls as instructed on another website devoted to sominiferum planting and care. I was so happy to see that some of the many seeds I’d planted had sprouted that I wanted to ensure they were planted in a place with ideal growing conditions. I chose an area that I had prepared for planting that measured approximately 3.5 feet by six feet. I dug up this area about six inches deep, lined it with double thick black garden fabric (just to be sure no weeds grew through), mixed the soil with compost and topsoil, and picked out as many stones, pieces of wood and roots that had grown from the old cedar stump (the tree was cut down in 1997) that was at one end of the growing area. I soaked the area well the night before. I dug holes for the seedlings that were still in the toilet paper rolls, so that the roll was completely surrounded by soil and extended up from the soil by about 1/4″. I watered the seedlings in their rolls and they were quite wet when planted. I did this before thinning them, because I wanted to make sure I chose the best seedling, waiting until their second set of leaves came in. I took 10 oz clear plastic cups (Solo brand) and cut two adjacent holes in each with a paper punch at the bottom of each cup so that they were at the very top of each cup when placed over the seedlings. I weighed each cup down with a smooth river rock. In the afternoon of the following day, I found that the sun had cooked each of the seedlings in their plastic cup greenhouse. Granted, yesterday was the hottest May Day on record for Western Washington, but I don’t think that using the plastic cups in early May was a very good idea for my particular situation. The tutorial says its to protect the plant from outdoor temperatures, slugs and birds. I do have a problem with huge slugs here, and the birds pick at any fruit that grows, like pyracantha, strawberries and huckleberries. Also, the black weed cloth seems to make the hot sun even warmer and I noticed that even my artichoke plants had fried in the sun. I chose this place to plant because it gets almost full sun. In the late afternoon it does get some shade, but it gets full sun in the morning and up until 2 or 3 pm in the afternoon. I know these poppies need full sun, and this piece of land is the very warmest part of my yard. Please tell me what I should do. I got your message saying that the reason my poppies plants are dying after they reach a height of one and 1/2 inches is because of the warmth. Should I buy a portable fridge to cool my seedlings? Is so how long should I use this to cool my plants? I could put a battery powered lantern in the fridge, but it seems like an awful lot of trouble to go through just to get a seedling to get past the early stage. However, I am willing to try it if there is no other way. I probably waited too long to plant, but the rain was very heavy here up until mid April. Living in Western Washington I’m sure you know the drill. Summer is not a gradual thing here, it happens very suddenly, one day it is cold and rainy and the next day it is hot and humid. I’m sure we will have more rain here before the summer actually starts. Last summer was the hottest on record. BTW, the variety that sprouted was the Black Swan. I have seeds on order from your company. I chose the variety mix thinking that it would give me the best chance of success if I tried several varieties at once. Maybe I should concentrate on the faster growing seeds since it is now so late in the season. In all these years of trying, I have never gotten past the two leaf seedling stage (about 1 1/2″ high),.

    I have Black Swan, Lauren’s Grape, Hungarian Blue, and Black Paeoniflorum seeds planted in peat pellets and toilet paper rolls filled with organic compost and soil. I also sowed some of the Black Swan variety in the area that I mentioned above. I have two Conservatory Flower Houses with misters and grow lights installed. I’m only growing a few kitchen herbs and roses in the green houses now. besides the poppy starts I mentioned. There are some plants that stunted and never got past the “start” stage-now I can’t identify them, but I think they are most likely beets because they are reddish green. I’m reserving the rest of the room to start poppies. I bought the materials to build a “grow box” with aluminum coated styrofoam and a small light that takes a CFC bulb, I was going to cover the outside of the box with black garden fabric to concentrate the heat, I could leave this off and use the ice cube method that you mentioned, what do you think about this?

    I noticed in your tutorial that you have some poppies doing well next to a building. Would it be a good idea for me to plant next to my house? Since I have a crawl space under the house I was worried about water accumulating there and breeding mosquitoes.

    If I plant oriental poppies as well, will they cross pollinate?
    What would be the best place to plant the seeds that I have on order?

    Thank you!

    Reply

    • OrganicalBotanicals
      05/06/2016 @ 1:40 pm

      Sorry for the delayed answer. I shot a video for you, but have not had time to edit. So please see these photos instead.

      – Planting Papaver Somniferum Poppies Late Season or Hot weather #1

      – Planting Papaver Somniferum Poppies Late Season or Hot weather #2

      Hope this helps for now.
      -OrgBot

      Reply

      • Kathleen
        05/07/2016 @ 2:50 am

        Thanks, great ideas, especially with the sheets of ice that I can easily do with stuff I have on hand. I will see if the cats don’t tear the netting down-they like to push my buttons, especially when I’m paying attention to something other than them. I shall have to take photos of all the seedlings that have just emerged in their peat pellets. They really germinate well when I put them in the greenhouse, I hope they will like being outside in the sun as much.

        Reply

        • OrganicalBotanicals
          05/07/2016 @ 2:11 pm

          The greenhouse will overheat them. My cat is the same way (as all are). But once his whiskers felt the resistance of the net, het backed off.
          I had to really make that net Firmly taut as Birds would find ways to stretch their beaks in. But if you’ve got sprouts already, then I wouldn’t worry about birds. They mostly just look for worms from the newly disturbed soil.
          And I have not had any slugs this year since the weather isn’t moist or cool enough.
          But ya, you need to get the out of their temp pots, since they won’t last long in them (water retention, and tap root).
          Now you’ll need to continue to thin them every few days.
          I’ve thinned out some as large as a dinner salad before. It killed me to do it, but it’s worth it.
          You give them the room, they’ll fill it (I prefer 18″ between each, 12″ minimum)

          Reply

  4. Kathleen
    05/02/2016 @ 11:57 pm

    Also, I have 4 cats that like to do their business in freshly turned earth where I plant seedlings. Other than disturbing the seeds, is this harmful to plants? Will it make the soil to acidic? My cats don’t seem to mind any of the sprays I use to deter them, so it is hopeless trying to get them to do their business elsewhere.

    Reply

    • OrganicalBotanicals
      05/06/2016 @ 1:51 pm

      My cat does the same. I used netting this year down my garden rows supported by a Cord that was tied to stakes in the ground at each end, with garden staples holding the net into the ground (creating a triangle shape down the entire row). This kept out bids (and cats), allowing Light and rain in, without heating things up..
      -OrgBot

      Reply

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